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Drawing

You will only do crude drawings while preparing. It can be done without a co-pilot but it will take longer and is inconvenient if you can't stop in towns. Either you have an very good visual memory or you must do the drawing yourself and have another one drive. If you have an co-pilot it is vital you stop BEFORE the situation so he can draw it. If you stop AFTER the situation there are high chances it will not be precise. Don't ask me why but this is a fact. Always wait until he has finished drawing and gives you a sign. It simply doesn't pay for the 2 seconds if you get an questionable drawing in return.

To the left you see the basic symbols I use. Most important is of course the single line for an unsurfaced lane and the double line with or without broken line for an tarmac road.

Click here for an example of a full first page.

Left: Raw drawing, right: final version

1. You always start in a situation like this. You are in a parking lot, left in front of you is a building.

Note what your tripmeter shows. In cases you only need one digit before the dot and one or 2 after the dot.

Important: You always come from the dot marking and go to the arrow.

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2. After 300 metres: This is the next one. You come to a larger road with a stop sign. Here you turn right. Note the trip distance in the case.

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3. After 720 metres: Now let's turn off tarmac and onto an unsurfaced road. This is just before electric overland line- an good indication for those having no tripmeters. Or no decimals as on elder Land Rovers. (See that I forgot the dot here? Something to be corrected before the event)

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4. After 200 metres: This is an situation where a track goes off to the left and one to the right. You stay in the middle. Note that the dot is replaced by the foot end of the arrow.

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5. After 70 metres: Near an building there's an fork. The track you take goes almost straight and crosses a bridge. Actually the building was an captured water source and the bridge was only 1 metre long.

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6. After 100 metres: Another bifurcation where you turn right. The left one is closed by an gate. Such an situation CAN be left out but you can bet that just on the event day the gate will be open and half of your folks will drive there.

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7. After 250 metres: This looks complicated but is in fact very easy. You stay on the track that turns a bit left.

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8. After 580 metres: You are now on tarmac. On a roundabout you turn onto the road to the right.

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